San Diego Military Divorce Attorneys

Many of the same issues arise in a military divorce as in a civilian divorce. Child support, child custody, alimony and even the division of marital property are affected by the enlisted or commissioned status of one or both spouses. For example, military divorces are affected by the Uniformed Services Former Spouse Protection Act (USFSPA) and its implications for health benefits, retirement pay and eligibility for commissary.

At The Law Offices of David P. Beeson & Associates, our attorneys work closely with military servicemen and servicewomen, as well as with civilian spouses, in military divorce cases. We explain how employment in the armed services impacts all aspects of a separation or divorce, including the division of marital assets, child and spousal support, child custody, and pension and retirement benefits.

Client Testimonial: Divorce is an emotionally challenging and confusing life event. David Beeson and his team provided me with superior legal advice and guidance that I needed to make the best of a difficult situation. All the best, Rachael

Divorce Lawyers for Active Duty and Retired Military Personnel in California

Protect your rights and interests in military divorce cases — contact the family law attorneys at The Law Offices of David P. Beeson & Associates today to schedule a free consultation to discuss your case.

Military Divorce and the Issues That Arise

At The Law Offices of David P. Beeson & Associates, we represent servicemen and servicewomen, as well as their spouses, in addressing:

  • Divorce
  • Child custody
  • Visitation
  • Child support
  • Alimony
  • Division of marital property
  • Division of marital debt
  • Pension and retirement benefits
  • Continuation of medical benefits

Gilmore Election, Military Pensions and Military Divorces

Under the Gilmore case, 29 Cal. 3d 418, a nonmilitary spouse can elect to receive his or her share of the armed serviceman or servicewoman's retirement pay when the armed services spouse is eligible to retire — whether or not he or she actually retires. Most service personnel become eligible to retire after 20 years of service. However, if the nonmilitary spouse decides to take his or her share once the military spouse reaches retirement eligibility, the amount awarded will not include any pay or promotion increases earned after such election is made.

Tucker v. Tucker, Military Pensions and Property Division

In the Tucker case, 226 Cal.App.3d 1249, a military spouse requested the trial court to set aside military retirement benefits as separate property in divorce. In Fletcher, the appellate court affirmed the decision that USFSPA grants service members the authority to consent or not consent to jurisdiction over military retirement benefits.

20/20/20 Spouse Rule, Medical Benefits, Military Divorce

The Uniformed Services Former Spouse Protection Act (USFSPA) provides protection of medical benefits and other military benefits to the nonservice member in divorce.

  • 20/20/20 rule (full benefits): Former spouses of military service persons are entitled to full military benefits (including lifetime medical benefits) and installation benefits if the duration of the marriage was at least 20 years, the service member had at least 20 years of credible service, and there was at least a 20-year overlap between the marriage and military service.
  • 20/20/15 rule (transitional benefits): Former spouses of military service persons are entitled to transitional military medical benefits for a period of one year if the duration of the marriage was at least 20 years, the service member had at least 20 years of credible service, and there was at least a 15-year overlap between the marriage and military service.
  • 20/20/10 rule (full benefits in special circumstances): In special situations, former spouses of military service persons who have been subjected to documented domestic abuse may be entitled to full military benefits and installation benefits if the duration of the marriage was at least 20 years, the service member had at least 20 years of credible service, and there was at least a 10-year overlap between the marriage and military service. This provision allows an individual to get out of a physically abusive marriage without the penalty of losing benefits.

Overseas Spouses

In cases where a serviceman or servicewoman is married to a noncitizen overseas spouse, child custody decisions and financial matters are a function of any treaty in place between the United States and the noncitizen's home country. In child custody cases, the Hague Convention often comes into play with international divorces. If a noncitizen spouse is from a country that does not have an enforceable treaty with the United States, the State Department or U.S. Embassy officials may need to be involved. Our lawyers can advise you of your rights under international law and help coordinate legal action between you and U.S. officials when necessary.

Contact Military Divorce Lawyers at The Law Offices of David P. Beeson & Associates Today

The issues that arise in a military divorce can be quite complicated, especially when dividing marital assets or dealing with a noncitizen U.S. spouse. We have the resources and experience needed to ensure your rights and interests are protected. To schedule a free consultation and discuss your case, contact military divorce attorneys at The Law Offices of David P. Beeson & Associates today.

For a free initial consultation with a San Diego military divorce and custody attorney at The Law Offices of David P. Beeson & Associates, call 619-618-2983 or 866-706-2015, or contact us online.

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